Final One Page Outline

 

Level 6 Film Production Major Project – One-Page Outline

Names: James Parkes, Georgia Ball, Charles McIntyre, Zheng Li

Film: Contract (Working Title)

Film Genre (or plot): Drama/Fantasy

Length: 20 Minutes

Target Audience: 15+

Tag-line: All good things must come to an end.

Premise: When a struggling couple receive a contract that promises the holder good fortune at the expense of half their lifespan, their world is turned upside-down.

Synopsis: Alan Waters is struggling. With a mundane job, lack of money, and the recent death of his father, Alan’s future is bleak. But when the enigmatic man going by the name, Mr. Coral visits Alan at his dingy apartment, he makes an offer Alan can’t refuse.

A contract. Upon signing, the holder is granted a lifetime of good fortune, ending their troubles permanently, and allowing Alan and his partner, Lucy, to live a life they’d only dreamed of. The catch? In exchange, the holder’s lifespan is reduced by half as payment.

It’s only when Alan gives into temptation, does he realise that those who live fast, die young, and that all good things must come to an end.

Visual Realisation: Contract begins in radiance of an ideal and peaceful life, despite bleak circumstances. This is to illustrate love is of greater importance than superficial possessions and money, and thus is the ‘equilibrium’ period.

This is shortly lived, as the unsettling nature of Mr. Coral and the contract subtly drains Alan, gradually making him appear frail – almost undead. As his soul is corrupted and his lifespan halved, the images become more and more desaturated and grey in spite of his good fortune. Agitated camerawork portrays Alan’s desperation and uneasiness that, in turn, reflects on the audience.

Statement of Intent: Contract is intended to portray life’s unexpected twists that turns, and how the smallest of things can change the course of one’s life. It is a mystery, yet rooted in a character-based narrative. A major theme is how naïve people can be, as we often sign contracts/terms blindly, and how corruptible and fragile the human soul is.

It is relatable to audiences with the notion of staying true to one’s self, and to appreciate life in both the good and bad.

Original One Page Outline

 

Level 6 Film Production One-Page Outline

Names: James Parkes, Georgia Ball, Charles McIntyre, Zheng Li

Film: Memoir (Working Title)

Film Genre (or plot): Drama/Thriller/Mystery

Length: 20 Minutes

Target Audience: 15+

Tag-line: TBA

Premise: When a married couple receive a mysterious box containing a videotape of the forgotten past, they set out to uncover the truth.

Synopsis: Set in contemporary Britain, Alan Waters is happily married to his wife, Katherine. But when a mysterious black box containing a videotape is delivered to him, his world is turned upside-down.

When played, the tape reveals his youth, and a message his younger self supposedly sent into the future. But Alan has no recollection of recording the message. His only clue: the name, ‘Capsule Inc.’ inscribed on the box.

Who is Capsule? Why did they send it? And is Alan really the one on the videotape? Confound and disturbed, Alan decides to track down the origins of the elusive sender in order for answers.

Visual Realisation: Memoir begins in radiance of an ideal and peaceful life that is only a glimmer in the whole picture of the narrative. This is shortly lived, as the unsettling nature of the videotape and its unknown origins sends Alan’s world into a blur as he and Katherine seek for answers. For every answer they try to unveil, darkness and desaturated imagery conceals the truth further. Agitated camerawork portrays Alan’s desperation and uneasiness that, in turn, reflects on the audience.

Statement Of Intent: Memoir is intended to portray life’s unexpected twists that turns, and how the smallest of things can change the course of one’s life. It is a mystery, yet rooted in a character-based narrative. The intent is less focused on the revelations and twists, but more on the exposition and mark of self-discovery. As the audience gradually learns more about Alan, we soon realise there’s more to him than meets the eye. Memoir contains themes of identification and loss, which is relatable to audiences with the notion of staying true to one’s self.